Early Warning Devices for a Downed Grid

Posted: November 22, 2014 in All Others, Bugging Out, SHTF Preparedness, Survival and Skills, Weapons
Tags: , , , , ,
K-9 Guarding Camp

K-9 Guarding Camp

Security is important to all of us. Let’s face it, today if you don’t have some sort of security system on your home, you’re just asking for some low life to come along and break in. However, even today if you have a security system you’re likely to become a victim of a property crime. So imagine when the grid goes down how vulnerable you and your family will be to someone who wants to separate you from your stuff. Hopefully you understand the need to have the following security and early warning devices.

Most of these devices are really simple to make. That’s part of the genius of these devices, they have been used for hundreds of years and have been very successful. They can be either fatal or just noise makers used to warn you of someone in your area. Most of these devices can also be employed while bugging out or during escape and evasion situations.

The following is a listing of my personnel favorites.

Dog Guard

K-9 Guarding Bug-out bag,

 

K-9 – Dogs are great early warning systems. Certain breeds can be better than others for this task. Some training may be required for your K-9 friend, but in the end a well-trained dog in certain situations will save your life. Either at the home or on the road, when you’re trying to get some shut eye your K-9 partner can have that extra set of eyes and ears that will keep you alive.

 

 

Tripwire Devices – Tripwire devices are very simple to put up and use. The key for these devices to be successful is camouflage. The tripwire must blended in with the environment.

Simple tripwire

Simple tripwire

The tripwire can be used to set-off another devices such as a flare, the even simpler rattle can alarm or even a deadly directional explosive. Tripwires rely on the fact that most people will move fast to an area and really not look for a small thin wire. Set-up between the height of an ankle and knee, the intruder will walk into the wire pulling whatever is on the other end. Simple yes, but very effective.

Home tripwire set-up

Home tripwire set-up.

 

Snare

Step through snare

 

 

Snare – Much like a snare used for trapping, these simple devices rely on the intruder moving into the snare, causing the snare to tighten and pulling whatever is on the other end. Like the tripwire, the snare can be used to trigger devices such as a flare or the even simpler rattle can alarm or even a deadly directional explosive. If this device is used indoors, do not to use any explosives, this could not only damage the building it could kill you.

 

 

 

Tiger Pit – Tiger pits in some form or fashion have been used since the beginning of time. Simply dig a hole based upon the size of what or who you what to catch or deter, and then camouflage the hole. The intruder moves across the camouflage and falls in.

Camouflaged pit

Camouflaged pit.

This type of trap has been modified to contain spikes and other evil things that the intruder will fall on causing incapacitation and later death. The device can be use indoors but you will have to destroy the floor of the building. However, this trap if set in the right location either indoors or out can and often is very affective.

Stone pit trap

Stone pit trap.

 

Ledge trap

Bucket on door

Ledge Traps – We all remember as a kid trying to set-up a bucket trap over a door. If you could get it set-up it provides us hours of laughter if our mother or father weren’t the victims. The principles are the same as the simple door trap. You set the bucket, other container or device on a ledge, run a cord or wire to an entryway or funnel area. As the intruder moves through the entryway or funnel area the intruder will pull the cord or wire causing the bucket, other container or device to fall or detonate. It may not be as funny as it was when we were kids, but it works.

 

Broken Glass – We have all seen the movies were the person being chased removes and breaks a light bulb, scattering it across the floor then hides in the shadows listens for the bad guy to come through the hallway.

Broken glass on floor

Broken glass on floor.

Using broken glass as an early warning device is basically the same thing. Break some glass, enough to cover the area you are concerned about.

Broken glass on a roof

Broken glass on a roof.

Find some glue, caulk or anything sticky that will dry and harden. Simply spread the glue or chalk across the area you are worried about such as a window sill or stair handrail. Add the broken glass before the glue or caulk sets-up. Don’t be too stingy with either the broken glass or glue. As soon and the intruder grabs or crosses the area, you will know it either from a scream or pain or the crushing of the glass. If you have an evil imagination you can add other things to improve this concept.

 

A couple of words of caution in reference to the above devices and systems. These types of devices and systems are illegal in most states. These devices and systems can also be deadly or cause serious bodily injury. Do not employ these device to protect your home until the SHTF. Remember, you do have currently have a responsibility under the law.

BYP US

 

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Comments
  1. Papa J says:

    My son and I made some trip wires with a rat trap and shot gun shell. He tried it on a friend. He left about 1/2 the gun powder in and packed it with cardboard. Depending on what your desires are, you can use just the primer, with gun powder or full shell. Also good to keep around for SHTF, is some carpet tack strip, just in case you were planning on installing some carpet on top of your fence. 🙂

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